Smoked Sockeye Salmon Recipe

December 15, 2013

Northwest Smoked Sockeye Salmon Recipe

Smoked-Sockeye-Salmon_2_800.gif
The top 2 fillets are Sockeye Salmon, the bottom 2 are Coho

Salmon. In the Pacific Northwest salmon is akin to Manna in the local food hierarchy. Yes, we have Dungeness crab, fresh oysters, cherries, apples, Walla Walla onions, asparagus, and many other fantastic local indigenous foods. But they are simply Barons and Lords on the food chain…Salmon is king.

While the seasonality of other local foods is celebrated, it is the annual run of wild salmon that Washingtonians, and chefs in particular, eagerly await with baited breath every May. It means that for the next few months all species of wild salmon will be available fresh. Restaurants and chefs scramble to be among the those few who offer the first fresh Copper River Sockeye Salmon of the year.

But even when the fresh season is over (actually, fresh king salmon is available almost year around, however, Sockeye and Coho are not), salmon continues to be an important part of our Pacific Northwest culture and our restaurant menus.

Now that the fresh Sockeye season has ended, here is an excellent recipe for Smoked Sockeye Salmon using frozen fish. Now I’m not to saying that frozen salmon isn’t good, because it is. It’s just that we get spoiled having fresh for five months, and while frozen salmon is good, fresh salmon is fantastic and always my first choice!

I’ve used this recipe now for a number of years and have never found a better one. The salt content is low, the finished product is still moist, and the smokiness “just right”. But, I recently learned a new technique, an added step, which takes this recipe from “really damn good” to “fucking amazing”! The new technique is to “allow the pellicle to form”…no additional ingredients, just an extra step. After brining, rinse the fish and dry with paper towels, then allow to air-dry in the cooler until a thin, moist layer forms (the pellicle). It takes at least an hour…I let it go overnight.  Then proceed with the recipe as normal. The result is smoked salmon which is more moist and which has a fantastic glaze-like sheen that will put a big-ass smile on your face!

The pellicle is a thin, tacky protein layer which forms on meat/fish after the brining process. It acts as a protective layer to keep the fish more moist. And it gives a better surface for the smoke to attach to during the smoking process. The end result puts a big smile on your face! Beautiful, moist, and delicious! Below are before and after pics of the difference of letting the pellicle form before smoking. Other than that one step, the recipe is identical and both are Sockeye Salmon with the same color before starting the recipe.

click on the images to enlarge

Smoked-Sockeye-Salmon_1_800.jpg
without forming the pellicle
Smoked-Sockeye-Salmon_4b_80.gif
with the pellicle forming step

 

Smoked Salmon Recipe

Yield: 1 Pound

Ingredients

Step 1

1          Qt       Water
½         Cup     Kosher Salt
½         Lb       Brown Sugar
3          Each    Bay Leaf

Step 2

1 ½      Qts      Cold Water
½         Qt       Soy Lite
¼         Cup     Cracked Black Pepper

1          Lb       Sockeye Salmon, skin-off, pin bones removed

Procedure

Heat the Step 1 ingredients until salt is dissolved.  Remove from heat and transfer to a container large enough to hold the salmon, yet narrow enough that the liquid will cover the salmon completely.

Add the ingredients from Step 2 and allow the brining liquid to cool to 41° or lower.

Add the salmon to the brine and leave it in the refrigerator for 1 day (18-24 hours).  Remove the salmon from the brine, rinse & dry thoroughly with paper towels. Place on a drain rack in the cooler or refrigerator for at least 1 hour, or up to 10 hours. This will allow the “pellicle” to form.

Have a smoker already lit and smoking using apple chips.  Place the salmon in the smoker for 2 hours.  For best results, the salmon should remain as close to 40° as possible.  Remove from the smoker and bake in oven at 325° to a temperature of 135°. Chill until ready to serve.

Using a very sharp, thin knife, carefully, slowly cut the salmon into the portion sizes you want and serve!

 

Posted In:Recipe


Huckleberry Sockeye Lox and Dungeness Crab Salad with Cucumber Wrap

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Dungeness_Crab_Roll_with_Sockeye_Lox_800.jpg

This lox recipe is one which I have developed over several years. It has a mild saltiness, a bit of sweetness, and is versatile in that it can be served as is, or added as an additional component to another dish. The lox can also be smoked if you wish, or served as is without smoking. In the picture, I served it as an appetizer in the restaurant. But I first served this dish as an individual amuse bouche for the 2013 Washington Wine & Food Show. We made about 2,500 of these little hummers! It took us 10 solid man hours just to slice the salmon! (My crew hated me.) But, we received HUGE accolades at the event, rave reviews, with people coming over saying, “I was told I had to come try your dish!”, or, “Is it ok to have thirds?” Now my staff was all smiles, knowing that all our work had paid off.

For the Huckleberry Sockeye Lox

Ingredients:

1 2 lb Side Thawed, previously frozen Sockeye Salmon, skin-off, pin bones removed

10 Tbl Light Brown Sugar
3 Tbl Kosher Salt
1 Tbl Orange Peel
2 Tbl Fresh Lemon Zest
4 Tbl Granulated Sugar
2 Tbl Fresh Tarragon Leaves
2 Tbl Fresh Dill, chopped
2 Cups Huckleberries, crushed (or Blackberries)

Procedure:

1) Trim the salmon of excess fat. Pat dry.
2) Cut 2 pieces of aluminum foil which are about 6” longer than the salmon fillet.
3) Combine the sugars, salt, and lemon zest. Mix well. Divide the mixture in half. Reserve.
4) Place the salmon in the center of one of the sheets of foil.
5) You will apply half of the ingredients to each side of the fillet:

  • Evenly sprinkle the top of the fillet with half of the tarragon and dill.Evenly sprinkle with half of the orange peel, lemon zest, sugar, and salt mixture.Place second piece of foil over all and carefully turn the salmon over. Remove the top piece of foil and repeat the above process of adding the ingredients on this side of the salmon. Replace foil and fold it multiple times on all sides so as to form a good seal.
  • For day one place on a flat pan (such as a cookie sheet) with at least a ½” raised edge and store in refrigerator overnight.
  • On day two place another flat pan on top of the salmon and add about 7 lbs of weight on top of it. Return to the refrigerator overnight.
  • On day three drain any liquid from the bottom pan, flip the salmon over, cover with the pan and weights, and return to the refrigerator overnight again.
  • On day four, remove the weights and the foil. Gently scrape the huckleberries and herbs from the fillet. Pat the salmon dry with paper towels.
  • Slice thinly and serve!

Store in the refrigerator, tightly wrapped in plastic wrap, for up to 5 days.

Notes: Because this is an uncooked product you should use a quality, frozen (and thawed) side of salmon so as to eliminate any possible danger from parasites.

 

For the Dungeness Crab Salad

Ingredients:

½ Cup Fresh Corn, cut from cob, roasted, cooled
12 Oz Dungeness Crab meat, lightly pressed but not squeezed
12 Oz Red Crab meat, lightly pressed but not squeezed
4 Tbl Shallot, minced
2 Tbl Fresh Chives, minced
1 Tbl Parsley, chopped
1 ½ Tbl Fresh Tarragon, chopped
3 Tbl Red Bell Pepper, brunoise
3 Tbl Yellow Bell Pepper, brunoise
2 Tsp Dijon
3 Tbl Panko
6 Tbl Apple Bacon, cooked, cooled, 1/4″ cut
¾ Cup Mayo
Pinch Sea Salt
Pinch Cayenne

Procedure:

Lightly press some of the excess liquid from the crab meats, but do not squeeze it all out. Combine all the ingredients and gently fold together. Adjust consistency with a little more mayo (to loosen) or panko (to tighten) as needed. Chill.

 

For the Cucumber Wrap

Ingredients:

About 5 ea. English Cucumbers, ends trimmed

Procedure:

Using a mandolin, thinly shave the cucumber into long, thin ribbons. Do not use the first few ribbons or the seeded section of the cucumber. You should be able to cut each ribbon in half and make 2 separate crab salad rolls from each ribbon. Form the crab salad into a ball about 1 oz, then roll into a cylindrical shape. Place on a cucumber ribbon, roll, set aside until service. You should have enough cucumber ribbon to go about 1.5 times around the filling to ensure that it will hold.

At service, top each roll with a slice of Huckleberry Los. Add fried taro root for “crunch”. I used Hearts of Fire leaves as a garnish, which I believe are a type of sorrel because they have a nice lemony flavor which accents the dish nicely. And I laid down a line of lemon aioli under the rolls in order to add a visual “anchor” to the presentation and to give the dish a little extra “zip” of citrus.

And finally, Time to Munch!
 

See David Buchanan on Google Plus

 

Posted In:Recipe


Sous Vide New York Steaks

Sunday, September 22, 2013

Sous-Vide-Supreme-Chef.jpgGot my new Sous Vide Supreme Chef and VacMaster VP-112 the other day and have been playing with it at work ever since! I’m hoping to be able to do Sockeye Salmon to order, cooked to 115° within 13 minutes and served within 15 minutes of getting the order. In the Pacific Northwest we love our Salmon cooked medium-rare, and doing it sous vide makes the flesh so delicate it melts like butter in your mouth! I’ll give details of my experiments below.

I’m also toying with the idea of doing our fabulous 14 oz Double “R” Ranch New York steak using the sous vide process. It would guarantee that the steaks were perfectly cooked to whatever temperature we determine for rare, medium-rare, etc. Of course, this would not eliminate steaks being returned to the kitchen…what the guest thinks is a medium-rare and what we know to be a medium-rare are not always the same thing (makes me want to play Gorden Ramsey with the customers sometimes!). But it would greatly reduce errors by cooks either over-cooking or under-cooking the steaks. I’ll share my lessons so far below.11

Salmon Sous Vide

VacMaster.jpg

OK, changing gears back to Salmon! We are a seafood restaurant so I tried Salmon first. The goal was to cook the Salmon to an internal temp of 115° within 14 minutes in order to meet our self-imposed 15 minute ticket time for entrees. I took our 7 oz portions of Sockeye and cut it on a severe bias into 3 medallions no more than 1/4″ thick. Then I seasoned them as normal, placed them in the bags with some extra-virgin olive oil, fresh sprig of tarragon, and squeeze of fresh lemon juice, and vac-sealed them using the VacMaster VP-112. The vac-seal process takes about 35-45 seconds, but is very simple.

Next, I placed the fish into the sous vide machine set to my desired temp of 115° and hoped that after 14 minutes it would reach an internal temp of 115°. What happened?…Failure!! It was at 101° which meant I’d have to increase ticket times (not good), or go back to the drawing board. So, back to the drawing board I went! Next, I tried setting the machine to 125° and did the same process. This time…almost success!! The Salmon was actually at 120° after 14 minutes. So I learned that achieving a 15 minute ticket time with 1/4″ medallions is possible…just need to fine-tune the timing to hit the 115° cooked mark.

Sous-Vide-Salmon-in-bag.jpgThe next challenge to overcome with the Salmon during dinner service is this: I’ll have multiple orders rung in over the span of 15 minutes, meaning that all night long we will have multiple Salmon cooking in the machine, all with different time frames. As each new order comes into the kitchen, I could theoretically have 15 different orders all space one minute apart! How the hell do I keep track of this mess, especially when dinner service is for 6-7 hours long?! Solution (thanks Chef John Jadamec): add a second digital clock set 14 minutes fast. Explanation: we currently use a digital clock to keep tickets on a 15 minute ticket time. Each ticket is automatically time stamped when we receive it, and we pace tickets so they “hit the window” after 15 minutes. By adding a second clock which is set 14 fast (the time it takes to cook our sous vide Salmon to 114°), it makes it possible for the Wheelman (Expeditor…the guy/gal calling the Wheel/tickets) to simply look at the pull time for the Salmon, write it on the vacuum packed bag, fire it into the sous vide machine, and know which Salmon to pull at exactly what time. This way multiple orders can be working with no confusion about what gets pulled when.

New York Steak Sous Vide

SV-VacMaster-New-York-Steak.jpgSous-Vide-NY-Steak-105-115.jpg

 

Preparing the New York sous vide is definitely more challenging, especially from a restaurant perspective. It takes approximately one hour to cook a 1″ thick steak to rare, medium-rare, and medium. Are you willing to wait an hour for your steak? That has epic failure written all over it. And since we can sell up to 45 NY’s in a night, to make this process work using the sous vide method means we’ll have to prep today for what we’ll need tomorrow. And I’ll have to get the re-therm process to work with-in about a 15 minute ticket time for dinner service.

So with this challenge to overcome, I tried two variations of NY. I wanted to know if a pre-seared steak or a raw steak worked better. The first steak I seasoned as normal, charred on the grill blue-rare, and chilled to 34°. The second, I seasoned as normal and left raw. Both were then vacuum-sealed and cooked sous vide to 125° (our medium). I then put them into an ice bath (still in their bags) to chill to 34°. The next day I re-thermed them as follows: the charred steak I placed in a 325° convection oven (low fan setting) until it reached 115° (about 10 minutes) and let the carry-over heat finish it out to 125°. The raw steak we seared in the Montegue broiler (top and bottom heat) for about 9 minutes. We let them rest then carved them up. We liked the raw-then-char preparation better because it had a more smoky, charred, grill flavor than the one we pre-seared then finished in the oven.

Knowing that the raw, un-seared version worked better, today we did our second test. I had two steaks, both raw, seasoned, vacuum sealed, and cooked sous vide then charred to finish. One was sous vide to rare 105°, the other to medium-rare 115°. Both were immediately chilled in their bags to 34° (a safety step for HAACP). I then used the Montegue broiler (top and bottom intense heat) and cooked the rare steak to 90° (about 5 minutes) and the medium-rare to 100° (about 7 minutes), let both rest for 3 minutes, and found that both rested out to their ideal temps of 105° and 115°…success!!

Sous Vide NY Steaks sliced
Rare is on the left, medium-rare on the right

Additional restaurant service challenges to overcome: since it takes about an hour to cook these puppies, ideally I would have at least 3 machines, one for cooking each temperature of steak (R, MR, M). I still have to see how many I can cook at once in the Sous Vide Supreme Chef machine… I think 10-14, but the cooking time will probably increase. Another HUGE, MONSTROUS, obstacle…if I am going to cook steaks for about an hour in a vacuum sealed bag, then chill them, and then re-thermalize them to order, I will probably have to get an approved HAACP plan by the local health department to verify that I am using/applying appropriate health and safety procedures. ?@#&%*! A necessary trip through purgatory…but holy crap what a pain in the a__ to accomplish! I heard that it took Chef Jason Wilson of Seattle’s Crush 90 hours to complete his! Not something I’m looking forward to, although I have already started the process.

As a note, here are our steak temps: rare 105° (60 minutes), medium-rare 115° (70 minutes), medium 125° (80 minutes), medium-well (not going to do MW sous vide), well-done (WTF?! Sorry if you like your steak this way, but I STRONGLY disagree. However, as a paying customer, if you want to put an automatic transmission in your Lamborghini I’ll do it for you.)

 

Posted In:Recipe


Shigoku Oysters with Seafood Mary Shaved Ice

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Shigoku Oysters with Seafood Mary Shaved Ice

Oysters_Seafood_Mary_Granita[1].jpgOyster purists will argue that raw oysters should be consumed as is, with no embellishment, with the possible exception of a squeeze fresh lemon! But for many of us the addition of some kind of sauce or condiment adds to the experience, making slurping oysters more fun and pleasurable. This recipe is a “twist” on the traditional cocktail sauce, with added fresh horseradish and lime juice to add a little “zip” to any oyster on the half shell. I’ve called this a Seafood Mary Sauce and it is actually a Granita, which is a preparation which is turned into shaved ice.

Shigoku Oysters are an elegant, deep cupped oyster with gorgeous black and gold shells. They are cultivated by using a unique method which tumbles the shells naturally with the rise & fall of the tides. They are placed in narrow, rectangular mesh cages which are attached to a horizontal line on one end, and have floats at the opposite end. Thus, as the tides ebb and flow the floats cause the cages to rise or fall, resulting in the gentle tumbling of the oysters in the cage. This tumbling chips the edges of the shell causing the oyster to grow a deeper cup rather than a broader or longer shell. It also creates very uniformly shaped, manicured shells. Shigokus have a briny bite, a clean, sweet flavor with a hint of cucumber and melon finish.

In the center of the dish I made an “ice sculpture” by freezing some pink peppercorns and tarragon in a rectangular mold. Its so easy to do and adds a cool presentation piece. Add about half the amount of water you need for the thickness you want (mine is about 1/2″ thick). Freeze it. Add about 1 or 2 tsp of water, then add your garnishes (pink peppercorns, etc). Freeze. Add remaining water to the thickness you want the sculpture to be. This process puts the garnishes “inside” the ice.

Ingredients

2 cups V-8 juice
1 1/2 tablespoons Tabasco
3/4 cup fresh lime juice
9 tablespoons ketchup
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh horseradish, micro-planed
Pinch sea salt

Procedure

Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl and mix thoroughly. Pour the mixture into a broad, shallow pan (such as a 2″ half pan, or a cake pane) and place in the freezer. As it starts to freeze, use a fork to drag through the forming crystals to break them up into shaved ice. Repeat this process about every 5-10 minutes until all of the mixture has frozen and been shaved into tiny crystals. The purpose of the process is to keep it from freezing into a solid block of ice. The resulting small crystals should have the consistency of a snow cone.

At service, use a brush to scrub the oyster shells clean. Carefully shuck them, being sure to preserve the precious liquor (the liquid inside of the oyster shell). There are a variety of ways to present them. You can serve them on crushed ice, rock salt, over mixed greens (spring mix), or any other thing that will keep the oysters level. At the last moment, add about 1 teaspoon of the granita on top of each oyster and serve immediately because the granite will melt quickly.

Slurp away!

 

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Caesar Salad on a Stick Recipe


May 25th, 2012

Caesar on a Stick served on a platterChef John Ponticelli has a way of “putting a twist” on tried & true dishes, reworking it so as to give a dish new flair.  He won the “Most Innovative” award for his Caesar Salad on a Stick recipe (pictured below) in the 2011 Box Lunch competition by Cater Source in Las Vegas.  He has also served his unique creation at various events held by the Tulalip Resort Casino located in Marysville, north of Seattle, WA.  The image to the left was served at an outdoor food & wine event for about 2000 people at the Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery.

Caesar Salad on a Stick

Serves 4 to 8 guests

8

8

2

2

8

Heads

Oz

Oz

Oz

Each

Caesar on a Stick with tear drop tomatoesRomaine hearts

Caesar Dressing

Croutons

Shredded Parmesan

Skewer sticks

Procedure:

Wash whole Romaine Lettuce drain, then peel off outer layers down to the heart or (desired size) keep lettuce core in tack, trim core bottom, don’t cut too much off the core, next take the skewers cut them down to 4 inch skewers, now insert skewers into the center of each Romaine Heart core, it should look similar to a corn dog.

Take the Croutons and crush them making course bread crumbs then mix with the shredded Parmesan, now you’re ready to assemble, using a brush coat each Romaine heart with the Caesar Dressings then sprinkle the Parmesan and Crouton mixture over each Romaine Heart, now you can display your Caesar on a Stick on a nice platter.

The size of your Caesar on a Stick can vary; you can make it larger for entree size or smaller for appetizers!

Chef John PonticelliChef John Ponticelli (JP) is the Garde Manger Chef de Cuisine at Tulalip Resort Casino

 

Comments from before Site Migration

SANJAY NAYAK [122.168.31.114]    [ Aug 15, 2014 ]

creative ……

 

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Dungeness Crab Cake Towers

February 13th, 2012

Dungeness Crab CakesCrab Cakes are a natural part of life in the Pacific Northwest.  The sweet flavor of Dungeness Crab makes Pacific Northwest crab cakes the best in the country (as far as I’m concerned!).  I prefer to make mine like small towers, rather than the typical pancake style of crab cake.  A good crab cake recipe will use very little “filler” ingredients such as bread crumbs and mayonnaise.  The predominant flavor of a good crab cake recipe should be (of course) crab!  If you’re at a restaurant and you need to cut your crab cakes with a knife… run away!  They should be tender and fall apart with a fork.

I pair them with 3 aioli sauces (light on the garlic): Lemon Aioli, Black Pepper-Dill Aioli, and Honey Mustard Aioli.  And adding a Granny Smith Apple Salad spiked with Watercress offers a nice counter-balance to the dish, a sort of palate cleanser between bites.

Dungeness Crab Cake Recipe from Blackfish Wild Salmon Grill

Ingredients

 1/3  Cup  Fresh Corn, roasted, cut from cob
 12  Oz  Dungeness Crab meat, lightly pressed but not squeezed
 2  Tbl  Shallots, minced
 1  Tbl  Fresh chives, minced
 1/2  Tbl  Parsley, chopped
 1/8  Tsp  Fresh Tarragon, chopped
 1.5  Tbl  Red Bell pepper, brunoise
 1.5  Tbl  Yellow Bell pepper, brunoise
 2  Tsp  Dijon Mustard
 3  Tbl  Panko or dried Bread Crumbs
 3  Tbl  Cooked Maple Bacon, 1/4″ dice
 1/3  Cup  Best Foods Mayo
 Pinch    Kosher Salt
 Pinch    Cayenne
 1  Each  Egg, lightly beaten

 

Procedure

Lightly oil corn on the cob, season, grill on a BBQ or roast in the oven. Cut kernels from cob, chill.

Combine crab, herbs, peppers, Panko, Dijon, bacon, mayo, corn and seasonings, fold together until well mixed. Add egg, gently fold into crab mixture.

Using a number 50 rind mold (available in sets at kitchen stores), form mix into tall disc (2.5 oz each). Spread some Panko on the counter and lightly press each crabcake into additional Panko on both sides, using just enough Panko for a very thin layer. Gently remove crabcake from mold and repeat until all the crabcake mix is used.

Over medium-high heat, sauté crabcakes in olive oil until golden brown, gently flip and sauté other side.

Finish in oven (set at 350°) to an internal temp of 145°. Serve!

 

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Chilean Sea Bass with Apple Lacquer

September 4th, 2010

Apple Lacquered Chilean Sea Bass

Apple Lacquered Chilean Sea Bass over Savory Fennel-Butternut Squash Bread Pudding

with Asparagus, Spaghetti Squash and Apple Beurre Blanc

Chilean Sea Bass has been a “hands off” fish for a number of years due to sustainability issues.  But now Seafood Watch reports that there is a sustainable option for Chilean Sea Bass which I hope to utilize occasionally.

I am working on a new dish for an up-coming event and need a small appetizer or large amuse bouche item.  I thought I would kill two birds at once and develop an entree version as a fall menu item as well.  Here is my entree version.  The amuse bouche version will not include the asparagus, squash or beurre blanc, but will include smaller versions of the Bread Pudding, Chilean Sea Bass, Apple Lacquer and something for a garnish.

Apple Fennel Butternut Bread PuddingThe dots in the Beurre Blanc are drops of the Apple Lacquer.  The dark specs on the Chilean Sea Bass is parsley which I should have spread more evenly and chopped a little finer.  I love the lattice or fan design of the asparagus.  I used the spaghetti squash to cover the bottoms of the asparagus, thus giving more “flow” and balance to the design.  There is some thyme in the bread pudding, so I used thyme as a garnish.  The savory bread pudding is exactly that… savory, not sweet like a dessert bread pudding.  I designed it as an accompaniment, and as a way to get “elevation” on the plate.  A key component of plate composition is “elevation”.  Of course, when the Chef asks for elevation on the plate, the cooks will usually make some unsavory suggestions!

Still Life Bread Pudding ingredients
Had to show you my Shun Chef Knife!!  Love it!

 

Savory Fennel-Butternut Squash Bread Pudding
2 Cups Fresh Rustic Bread cubes 1) Toast bread cubes until golden brown in oven.  Cool to room temp.  Reserve.
1/411/2

1/4

1/4

CupTblCup

Cup

Cup

Shallots, mincedWhole Unsalted ButterCelery, diced

Fennel, diced

Butternut Squash, 1/4″ dice

2) Sweat 

 

11/21

1/2

TspTblTbl

Tbl

Fresh ThymeFresh BasilFresh Parsley

Garlic, minced

3) Add & sweat.  Cool, reserve.
11 CupEach Half & HalfEggs 4) In separate bowl, make custard.  Reserve 1/4 cup, add remaining to bread cubes.  Add above ingred., mix.  Let stand 10 minutes for bread to soak in custard.
21 TblCup Parmesan, gratedDried Apple, diced 5) Add, fold into mixture.6) Place mixture in ramakins or muffin tins which have been sprayed w/ pan spray.  Add reserved custard if needed.

Bake in 350 degree oven until done.

 

Apple Beurre Blanc
1  Tbl Shallots, sliced 1) Sweat
2  Tsp Unsalted Butter
1/2  Cup Granny Smith Apples, cored,   peeled, chopped
1/4  Cup Apple Juice 2) Add, reduce au sec
1/4  Cup White Wine
1/4  Cup Apple Jack Brandy
1/4  Cup Heavy Cream 3) Add, reduce to consistency (by about 2/3)
8  Oz Unsalted Butter, chilled, cubed 4) Add slowly, whisking constantly over low heat.
2-4  Tsp Honey 5) Add TT
Pinch Sea Salt

 

Apple Lacquer
 216  TblOz Black PeppercornsApple Cider Vinegar 1) Reduce in non-reactive pan to 3-4 oz, strain.
 23-44  CupsOzOz Apple Juice ConcentrateCider Vinegar ReductionHoney 2) Add, reduce by half.
Thicken to the consistency of maple syrup with Clearjel or Cornstarch slurry.
 Pinch Sea Salt 3) Finish TT

 

Apple Lacquered Chilean Sea Bass
6PinchTT Each 7 oz portions Chilean Sea BasParsley, mincedKosher Salt 1) Season and sear top & bottom of bass.Add Apple Lacquer to top of bass.  Bake for several minutes, add more Lacquer, bake until done (about 130 degrees), add more Lacquer.Plate and serve!

 

My recipe style disclaimer:   I have decided to leave my recipes in their original format rather than convert them to standard cookbook language.  Recipes written for a professional kitchen use different verbage than recipes written for cookbooks.  Professional kitchen recipes assume that the cooks have a solid understanding of culinary terms and techniques.  My recipes are written in this “Chef’s Shorthand”, meaning that clear culinary terms are used for procedures where possible.  This cuts down on a lot of extra words and makes for quick reading in the kitchen.  For instance, most cookbooks will have the following phrase for cooking onions, “in a pan over medium heat add oil and cook onions without caramelizing until translucent”.  In Chef’s Shorthand this entire phrase is replaced by “sweat onions”.  That’s it, short and sweet!  And it means exactly the same thing.If you are a professional cook, or have been to culinary school, then you should be familiar with most of the terms.  If not, then please use our dictionary link for the terms you are unfamiliar with and enjoy learning something new!  Or post a question, I’d love to respond.

 

Comments from before Site Migration

Add a Comment!

DAVID BUCHANAN    [ Sep 06, 2010 ]

Kurt, thank-you for your kind comment.  And for your conscientious comment about the sustainability of Chilean Sea Bass, I should have added info re: it into the post.  There is some Chilean Sea Bass which is considered sustainable.  Here is a quote from the Monterey Bay Seafood Watch program’s page on Chilean Sea Bass:

“… a small fishery exists that has made improvements in their fishing gear – to reduce seabird bycatch, and in their management plan – to end overfishing. In March 2004, the South Georgia Patagonian Toothfish Longline Fishery was certified as sustainable to the standard of the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)

Since only a small portion of the Chilean seabass available in the U.S. is MSC certified, consumers must be very careful. Each location that sells MSC products, including all restaurants and grocery stores, are required to have the MSC “Chain of Custody” certification. Legitimate purveyors should be able to produce this document when asked and, without this proof, consumers should assume the fish in not certified and shouldn’t make the purchase.

KURT MICHAEL FRIESE [173.31.177.6]    [ Sep 06, 2010 ]

Your recipe looks delicious, though I hope your readers will consider doing it with a better choice of fish, such as sable.  Chilean Sea Bass is an extremely endangered fish harvested in very unsustainable fisheries.  For more information on it and many other endangered fish, as well as good, sustainable alternatives, please visit the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program

Posted In:Recipe


Dungeness Crab Stuffed Shrimp

August 4th, 2010

Dungeness Crab Stuffed Shrimp

Dungeness Crab stuffed Jumbo Shrimp over Blackberry Beurre Rouge with Zucchini wrapped Sunrise Blend Rice

I love the presentation on this dish… simple yet rather elegant. It’s essentially one long line with variations of color and shape along the way. The rice is a gourmet blend wrapped in a zucchini ribbon (rather than just being mounded on the plate) and baked to re-therm the rice. And on top of the rice is a variation on ratatouille (removed the eggplant and tomato, added edamame).

If available, I highly recommend using Alaskan Spot Prawns instead of regular shrimp. The Spot Prawns are so much more tender and flavorful. They are the “lobster” of the shrimp world. And if you get some with the gorgeous orange-red roe… you’ve scored! The roe can be lightly brined and smoked for an awesome garnish. It has great flavor, but only use the roe if they are solid individual eggs, not mushy or broken (which sometimes happens when they are frozen).

 

Dungeness Crab Stuffed Shrimp

12

2

1

1/2

1/8

1 1/2

1 1/2

2

3

1/2

Pinch

Pinch

3

Oz

Tbl

Tbl

Tbl

Tbl

Tbl

Tbl

Tsp

Tbl

Cup

Oz

Dungeness Crab meat lightlypressed

Shallots, minced

Fresh Chives, minced

Fresh Parsley, chopped

Fresh Tarragon, chopped

Red Bell pepper, brunoise

Yellow bell pepper, brunoise

Dijon

Panko

Mayo (Bestfoods)

Kosher Salt

Cayenne

Fresh Scallop, side muscle removed, pureed

Procedure for Stuffing:

Flake the crab so the leg meat is shredded.

Gently fold all ingredients together.

20

1

6-8

2

Each

Cup

Oz

Tbl

13/15 Shrimp, P&D, Tail-On

Leeks, thin sliced into discs

Dry White Wine

Whole Unsalted Butter, chilled

Procedure for Shrimp:

Preset oven to 375 degrees.

Form the stuffing into 20 equal balls, about 3/4 oz each. Place the shrimp on your cutting board w/ the cut side down, add a portion of the stuffing, fold the tail over the top, fanning the tail. Repeat all.

You may need 2 pans to cook this amount. Layer the leeks onto the bottom of the pan. Gently add the shrimp, add wine around edges of pan. Add butter.

Bring to a simmer, cover, finish in 375 degree oven until the stuffing is cooked through (about 10 minutes). Discard leeks & wine.

Arrange Shrimp over Blackberry Beurre Rouge.

Notes:

  • 13/15 Shrimp P&D Tail-On means: Jumbo shrimp (13 to 15 per pound), which you have Peeled & Deveined but have left the tail portion of the shell on.
  • Beurre Rouge is a red wine butter sauce.
  • the purpose of the scallops is to add texture, binding power, and complexity of flavor.

 

Blackberry Beurre Rouge

1

2

4

1/4

1 1/2

1/4

8

2-4

Pinch

Tbl

Tsp

Oz

Cup

Tsp

Cup

Oz

Tsp

Shallots, sliced

Unsalted Butter

Blackberries

Merlot

Raspberry Vinegar

Heavy Cream

Unsalted Butter, chilled, cubed

Honey

Sea Salt

1) Sweat

2) Add, reduce au sec

3) Add, reduce to consistency (by about 2/3)

4) Slowly add, whisking constantly over low heat.

5) Finish TT

The rice is a Sunrise Blend Rice from Inian Harvest Company. I made zucchini ribbons by slicing long, thin strips of zucchini on the Mandoline, placing two ribbons in an 8 oz souffle cup (oiled), and filling it with the hot rice. Bake it for about 7 minutes at 350 degrees just to soften the zucchini. Gently flip onto the plate and let the contents slide out.

Add sauce, shrimp, serve!

 

My recipe style disclaimer:

I have decided to leave my recipes in their original format rather than convert them to standard cookbook language. Recipes written for a professional kitchen use different verbage than recipes written for cookbooks. Professional kitchen recipes assume that the cooks have a solid understanding of culinary terms and techniques. My recipes are written in this “Chef’s Shorthand”, meaning that clear culinary terms are used for procedures where possible. This cuts down on a lot of extra words and makes for quick reading in the kitchen. For instance, most cookbooks will have the following phrase for cooking onions, “in a pan over medium heat add oil and cook onions without caramelizing until translucent”. In Chef’s Shorthand this entire phrase is replaced by “sweat onions”. That’s it, short and sweet! And it means exactly the same thing.

If you are a professional cook, or have been to culinary school, then you should be familiar with most of the terms. If not, then follow the link to the Food Lover’s Glossary for the terms you are unfamiliar with and enjoy learning something new! Or post a question, I’d love to respond.

 

Comments from before Site Migration

Add a Comment!

FOODSHO    [ Aug 07, 2010 ]

Really Nice!

NORAH [97.124.233.222]    [ Aug 05, 2010 ]

great recipe!!  who doesn’t love crab and shrimp!!  thanks for sharing.

https://theepicuriosity.wordpress.com

RAVIENOMNOMS [159.245.32.2]    [ Aug 05, 2010 ]

This looks fantastic! Love crab and even more when it is stuffed in shrimp! Thanks for the recipe!

DAVID BUCHANAN    [ Aug 04, 2010 ]

Thank-you Lemons & Anchovies for the feedback on my recipe style.  I have been hesitant to post them this way.

Cooking Canuck… sounds like you’re due for another trip south!

HTTP://WWW.COOKINCANUCK.COM [67.166.124.113]    [ Aug 04, 2010 ]

What a beautiful preparation!  I have fond memories of enjoying steamed Dungeness crab on the Oregon coast with my family.  This makes me yearn for that again.

HTTP://LEMONSANDANCHOVIES.WORDPRESS.COM [69.181.209.42]    [ Aug 04, 2010 ]

This is an absolutely beautiful dish.  I appreciate the organization of your cooking instructions, too.

 

Posted In:Recipe


Seafood Mary

Friday, July 16, 2010

Seafood MaryThis dish is a sampler appetizer of some of the Pacific Northwest’s favorite seafood.  Dungeness Crab, House Smoked Sockeye Salmon, fumet poached Scallop and Shrimp… King Neptune himself would savor this dish!  The bottom of the cup has finely diced cucumber & tomato.  And it is paired with a Seafood Mary Sauce, which is an updated cocktail sauce using fresh grated horseradish and fresh squeezed lime juice.  I feel that this ‘lighter’ sauce compliments the seafood better than a traditional cocktail sauce which is thick and tends to cover and mask the flavors of the seafood.

Seafood Mary Recipe

serves 1

 

Ingredients:

3     Each       Dungeness Crab Fancy Legmeat

1     Each       U-10 Shrimp Alaskan Spot Prawn, poached, chilled

1     Each       U-10 Scallop, poached, chilled, cut in half to form 2 disks

4     Tbl          Cucumber, brunoise

4     Tbl          Tomato Concasse

1     Oz           Smoked Salmon on NW Skewer

1     Each       Lemon Wheel, thin slice

1     Each       Lime Wheel, thin slice

1     Each       Lemon Wedge, curled

1     Each       Fennel Sprig

1     Oz           Seafood Mary Sauce

Procedure:

Gently poach the Shrimp to Medium in 1 Qt fumet seasoned w/ 1 Tbl Old Bay.  Chill Shrimp in walk-in (do not chill in ice water as this will deplete flavor).  If the shrimp is cooked properly it should be slightly translucent in the center after it cools.  Do the same with the Scallop separately.

For assembly, use a Martini Glass or similar glass.  Arrange the cucumber on one half of the bottom of the glass and arrange the tomato on the other half.  Arrange the seafood in a presentable manner, trying to get each item to be visible out of the top of the glass.  Place a slice of lemon and lime wheel between the two slices of the scallop.  Add the lemon wedge and fennel frond garnish.  Finish with the Seafood Mary Sauce, poured gently down the center of the seafood but not splashing it all over.  Add another 2 oz of the Sauce to a side dish for dipping.

 

Seafood Mary Sauce Ingredients:

1 Qt V-8 Juice
3 Tbsp Tabasco
1  1/2 Cups Fresh Lime Juice
1 Cup Ketchup
3 Tbsp Fresh Horseradish, micro-planed
1/8 Tsp Sea Salt

 

Seafood Mary Sauce Procedure:

Combine all and mix well.  It may need a touch more lime juice or salt.

The Seafood Mary Sauce also goes well with fresh Oyster Shooters.  I recommend using Grey Goose Vodka in the shooters and a splash of the Seafood Mary Sauce.  There are over 65 varieties of raw oysters to choose from in the Pacific Northwest.  That’s a lot of Shooters!

 

Posted In:Recipe


Pacific Northwest Salmon on a Stick

July 13th, 2010

Gifts of the Earth

Salmon on a Stick

Salmon on a Stick is a fantastic preparation method for slow-roasting salmon on Iron Wood sticks over wood coals.  The preparation is at least several centuries old and is part of a rich tribal heritage for the Pacific Northwest’s Coast Salish First Peoples who regard salmon and nature with reverence.  In our restaurant, a tribal member hand-carves these traditional sticks for us to use.  He finds the Ocean Spray plant, says a prayer of thanksgiving before harvesting what he needs, then carves the sticks.  Tribal cultures show thanksgiving not only for the meal itself, but also for the earth which provided the sticks.

The beauty of the trees, the softness of the air,
the fragrance of the grass speaks to me.

The summit of the mountain, the thunder of the sky,
the rhythm of the sea, speaks to me.
The faintness of the stars, the freshness of the morning,
the dewdrop on the flower, speaks to me.

The strength of the fire, the taste of salmon, the trail of the sun,
and the life that never goes away, they speak to me
And my heart soars.

~ Chief Dan George

In an excerpt from article called, S’abadeb — The Gifts: Pacific Coast Salish Art and Artists we can see a glimpse of the Coast Salish culture:

“To Coast Salish First Peoples, the earth is the ultimate source of nourishment and knowledge. Like many cultures worldwide, the earth provides the Coast Salish gifts of food, shelter, clothing and medicine.”

“One way that the Coast Salish celebrate their respect for the earth is through First Foods Ceremonies. These ceremonies honor traditional foods — water, clams, duck, elk, salmon, sprouts, berries — and celebrate the appearance of these foods at certain times of the year. First Foods Ceremonies involve the entire community. Many people come together to harvest and prepare special foods for the ceremonies. They also sing songs to thank the earth for providing them with these important foods, year after year. One important First Foods Ceremony is the First Salmon Ceremony.” Read more…

We did a charity event for a children’s camp called Camp Korey in Carnation, WA a few years ago.  Camp Korey is specially designed for children with life-altering medical conditions, and allows them to safely enjoy the activities of traditional camp. Very cool people there.  I had the opportunity to prepare salmon on a stick for about 300 people outside on a beautiful summer day!  A gentleman named Tal spent the entire day tutoring me (thanks Tal!!) on how to pull this off in an outdoor setting since I had only prepared it in the kitchen.  The camp built us a 10′ by 20′ fire pit and filled it with river sand.  Tribal members donated the use of their sticks for the event (no small generosity… these sticks are highly cherished and passed down from one generation to the next).

Traditional Salmon on a Stick by Chef David of Tulalip Resort

This was an exciting, exhilarating experience not only because it benefited such an awesome camp for kids (the event raised $850,000 for Camp Korey and the kids!), but also because I had the opportunity to prepare salmon in the traditional manner used for generations by tribal peoples.  In the kitchen we need to get the salmon on the stick done in about 20 minutes in order to meet the demand of customers wanting a restaurant meal.  But here, we truly prepared it the traditional way which meant that the fish (fresh wild king salmon) took about 1 1/2 to 2 hours to slowly roast!  We rotated the sticks, moving them closer or farther from the fire as needed, flipping them upside down to promote even cooking, and turning them so that both the skin side and the flesh side were kissed by the fire.  The natural white fat of the belly meat (which most of us white folk cut off and toss) became like a savory candy when slowly roasted this long!  Awesome!!!

Heritage Salmon_2.pngOK, so on to the actual recipe!  We serve Heritage Sockeye Salmon on a Stick with fresh corn fritters and grilled asparagus.  There is some dispute about the preferred seasoning to use on the salmon.  Purists say use only clean ocean water to season the fish before roasting.  Some say use only salt & pepper, and others prefer Johnny’s Seasoning Salt.  I use my own recipe which is sort of (distantly) related to Johnny’s.

As for the Iron Wood sticks themselves… very hard to come by.  You can inherit them (tribal members pass them down from one generation to the next), be gifted them, or make them yourself.  I know of no place where they can be purchased.  I’m still hoping for my own set for home some day!

You can prepare this around a fire pit, preferably with a layer of sand for the sticks.  Or better, on the beach with freshly landed salmon!

Salmon on a Stick

10

6

8

6

6

8

Tbl

Tbl

Tbl

Tbl

Tbl

Tbl

Kosher Salt

Sugar

Paprika

Granulated Garlic

Fresh Ground Black Pepper

Granulated Orange Peel

Combine all, mix well.
8 Each Salmon fillet, Skin/on PBO 8 oz square-cut Generously season the salmon, flesh side only.

Procedure:

Start an Alder wood fire 2 hours before you plan to cook so as to get a nice coal bed.  The best size wood is about 3″ to 4″ square by however long.  Restock the fire as needed, looking to build a good coal bed, not a bonfire.  You want nice coals with small flames by the time you start cooking.

Place the salmon fillet on a sturdy table with the skin side down and with the thickest part towards you.  Place the point of the stick just above the skin and carefully but firmly push it through the fillet, trying to make the point follow as close to the skin as possible (as if you are trying to slide the stick under the flesh and against the skin).

Leave about 7″ at each end of the stick so you can insert it into the ground and flip it as needed.  When the coals are ready, place the stick vertically into the sand or dirt. If you place your hand with palm up at the spot where your salmon is you can roughly judge the cook time.

If you can only keep your hand there for 5 seconds then you are looking at about 20 – 30 minutes for MR sockeye, 25 – 40 minutes for king (they are thicker).  If you can hold your hand there for 10 seconds or longer then you have about 1 1/2 – 2 hours cook time (this is the preferred traditional method and the extra wait is worth it!).  If you cannot hold your hand there for 5 seconds then move the fish farther away.

Start with the skin side towards the fire first (some say the flesh side first, but I was trained skin side first.  It makes sense as this will cause the skin to shrink around the stick so the salmon won’t slide).  About 1/4 of the way through the cooking process pull the stick out of the ground and plant the stick with the flesh side towards the fire.  And finally, just before serving, put the skin side towards the fire one last time for 5-10 minutes.  This will draw the fat back towards the inside of the flesh.  Also, depending upon how evenly the top pieces of salmon are cooking you may need to flip the stick during the cooking process once for the skin side and once for the flesh side.

 

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Posted In:Recipe


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